Plantar Fasciitis Night Splint – Tendonitis, Heel Spur, Arch Pain – Achilles Tendon

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$29.99

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Product Features

 

GENTLY EXTENDS YOUR FOOT – This night splint for men and women is designed to keep your foot properly stretched all night, greatly reducing pain, discomfort and pressure on the affected area.

LESS FOOT PAIN IN THE MORNING – Constantly dealing with pain after taking your first few steps upon waking? This foot boot brace helps provide long-term relief from plantar fasciitis symptoms.

SNUG & COMFORTABLE FIT – Keep your foot comfortable all night. This night splint’s inner lining features open cell foam and soft nylon. Its breathable fabric also ensures excellent ventilation.

IDEAL FOR PHYSICALLY ACTIVE PEOPLE – Do you spend most of the day walking, running or standing? This plantar night splint helps relax and relieve your tired foot at the end of the day.

BUILT TO LAST – Made of medical-grade plastic, this night splint is ready for daily use. Its hard hell protects your foot from impact while ensuring correct foot positioning while you sleep.

Product Description

Description

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain

Are you constantly feeling sharp pain on your foot every time you get up in the morning? You might be dealing with plantar fasciitis, which strains the connective tissue running from the front of your foot to your heel.

Wearing a foot brace can help, but most of these easily break or are extremely uncomfortable. If you want to enjoy real relief from plantar fasciitis symptoms, wearing this durable and comfy night splint is the solution.

Free your foot from discomfort with the DMEforLess Plantar Fasciitis Night Splint

Lightweight, durable, and breathable, this foot brace is all about helping you wake up in the morning feeling refreshed and pain-free. It features adjustable dual-tension dorsiflexion straps that stretch the bottom of your foot, relieving tension and pressure caused by plantar fasciitis.

To keep your foot from sliding out of place while you sleep, this night splint is fitted with 3 wide straps with buckle fasteners. The brace also comes with a removable foam wedge that easily slips under your foot for added elevation.

The splint’s treaded bottom helps prevent slipping if you need to get out of bed during the night. However, we do not recommend using it while walking.

Need more time to make a decision? Here are more reasons to love this night splint:

  • Uses medical-grade hook-and-loop attachments
  • May be worn on the left or right foot
  • Latex-free material
  • Easy to wear and remove
  • Breathable foam helps prevent itching and skin irritation

Start the day with fully rested feet.

Additional information

Additional information

Weight0.0 lbs
Dimensions0.0 × 0.0 × 0.0 in
size

SM, MD, LG

Size Chart & Fit Help

Important:

  • This splint will feel awkward when you first begin wearing it.
  • It takes most people roughly 10 days to get used to wearing this splint for a full night.

When should my pain go away?  While there is not an exact time frame, most people begin to feel relief within the first week.

Can I walk in my splint?  No. This product is non weight bearing.  Please do not walk in it.

How long should I wear my splint? Most likely you will need to build up tolerance to wearing your splint for a full night sleep.  This process typically takes about 2 weeks.  To start, wear your splint for 1-2 hours while you are sitting and resting in the evening.  Another option when beginning is to keep your splint near the side of your bed, then 10 minutes prior to getting out of bed apply your night splint.  Remember to remove your splint before getting out of bed and walking.

How much flexion do I need to set my splint at? This is based on your level of tolerance.  Typically, you start with a mild flexion and progress to more flexion as time goes on.

It is okay if my toes hang over the edge or do not come all the way to the edge of my splint?  Either fit is fine.  The most important point to keep in mind is that you want a good stretch in your foot.  If you wear your brace and begin to experience pain relief, it is working.  If you are not getting a relief, you may need a different size.

Product Questions

Please login to post questions.

Question:

It is okay if my toes hang over the edge or do not come all the way to the edge of my splint?

k.johnson
26-Feb-2021

Answer:

Either fit is fine. The most important point to keep in mind is that you want a good stretch in your foot. If you wear your brace and begin to experience pain relief, it is working. If you are not getting a relief, you may need a different size.

Question:

How much flexion do I need to set my splint at?

k.johnson
26-Feb-2021

Answer:

This is based on your level of tolerance. Typically, you start with a mild flexion and progress to more flexion as time goes on.

Question:

How long should I wear my splint?

k.johnson
26-Feb-2021

Answer:

Most likely you will need to build up tolerance to wearing your splint for a full night sleep. This process typically takes about 2 weeks. To start, wear your splint for 1-2 hours while you are sitting and resting in the evening. Another option when beginning is to keep your splint near the side of your bed, then 10 minutes prior to getting out of bed apply your night splint. Remember to remove your splint before getting out of bed and walking.

Question:

Can I walk in my splint?

k.johnson
26-Feb-2021

Answer:

No. This product is non weight bearing. Please do not walk in it.

Question:

When should my pain go away?

k.johnson
26-Feb-2021

Answer:

While there is not an exact time frame, most people begin to feel relief within the first week.

Reviews (5)

5 reviews for Plantar Fasciitis Night Splint – Tendonitis, Heel Spur, Arch Pain – Achilles Tendon

  1. Beverly J

    My foot felt very stable and comfortable. I like the ease of putting it on and the comfort of this product. I would recommend this item if you are suffering with plantar fasciitis, its helping me. – Beverly J

  2. Alisha L

    I like it! I’ve spent close to a grand on my feet in the last year, all in the name of the dreadfully foul ‘Plantar Fasciitis’. PF hit me hard in Feb 2020. I’ve never had foot problems, so it was like going from 0-100 when the pain first came on. Out of all the methods I’ve tried and products I’ve tested, I had yet to test a night time brace. So this is my first.

    I ordered a size Small. I am a size 6 or 7 in the USA but typically order a 7 or 8 because of my exceptionally wide feet. I was concerned with how the small would fit (it’s for up to size 7) but it fit perfectly. As you can see in the photos I have some room left over length-wise and my wide foot doesn’t even touch the sides. Small was a good choice for me.
    Buckling the bottom two straps was a chore. The one side of the buckle is so close to the brace – too close – and because of my severe foot pain I can’t tilt and bend my feet so I had to do it one handed hunched over with my knee digging into my chest in an effort to get my foot close enough to buckle it and honestly I began to lose my breathe and my patience by the end of it! – Alisha L

  3. C. T.

    Good for stretching calves. Damaged the muscle in one of my legs a few years ago and now it tends to stiffen up easily and aggravates my heel spurs. I’m constantly trying to stretch it on stairs and curbs but this is much more effective. This device allows me to gently stretch while I’m watching tv or reading which gives me a much more concentrated stretch than just randomly stretching when I’m walking around. Since I’ve been using this (for a couple of weeks) my calf hasn’t tightened up at all and my heel spurs haven’t given me any issues at all. I wish I had found this years ago, but I’m glad I have it now! – C.T.

  4. Lisa L

    I wear a women’s size 9 – 9.5 wide shoe and the Medium fits perfect.

    For me this is a bit of a torture device. I have a very tender heel (heel spur area), so touching it is painful, so a brace that touches my heel is a risk – this one actually offers enough padding that it doesn’t cause me any additional pain or put pressure on my heel.

    However the wedge drives me nuts as the hook and loop strip hurts the toe pad of my foot like crazy – and I have not issues with pain there at all. I just can feel the stiff hook strip through the padding and my sock. So I can’t use the wedge. Which is fine as the side straps can be adjusted to pull your foot up insanely tight anyhow. The wedge has very limited adjustment from front to back to find the sweet spot to get the best elevation of the ball of your foot – an issue for me as well as I couldn’t get the wedge far enough back to do more than raise my toes.
    Overall this brace is really good with plenty of adjustments.
    The plastic form of the brace has a natural up curve to the foot bed all by itself. The bottom of the brace has a little sole to it, but this is not made for walking in and can be quit slick and the potential for slipping and falling is pretty high. So there in lies the rub, if I have to take it off to get around or go to the bathroom I’m not going to wear this as much as needed to recover. Wearing it to bed takes some getting used to, but the main issue I have is the hook and loop pads stick to everything besides the sheets, so you can get wrapped up or stuck in your blankets. So I wear this in the evening while watching TV as the only comfortable and tolerable time to wear it.

    On first use I immediately feel it pull the calf muscles and stretch that, not the exact goal I had in mind, but along with that comes some stretching of the achilles tendon, which is part of the issue, and only limited (very mild) stretch to the plantar fascia area on the bottom of the foot and up the heel where my main issue. Adjusting the side straps lifts the front of the foot and increases the stretch.

    The buckles suck, as they are very hard to unclasp. I find I have to hold them just so, so and squeeze like crazy to get them to release. Pinch style buckles would have been nice and much easier. Depending on the thickness of your calf and ankle you may need to cut the cross over straps as they are overly long once pulled tight and drag on the floor and cling to stuff.

    Once on and adjusted this brace feels exactly like wearing hard sided ski boots and you walk the same in it as well. Overall I believe this will help in time and getting used to it will come in time as well. I have to use other types of braces, wraps and/or tape during the day. – Lisa L

  5. Eddie T

    Saved my heel and me from pain!!! Oh my gosh!! I’m 63, plantar fasciitis, lots of tile in my house, I haven’t been able to walk on floors with my heel, so much pain. I’ve been soaking it in hot baths, using my foot massager, like the miko shiatsu massager, wearing some wonderful house slippers ( solo beam fuzzy slipper), was still sore UNTIL I used this splint. First time I only put it on for like 20 minutes, if that! couldn’t sleep in it, so watching tv for a few hours (and I walked around with it on, Not easy) but had it on for maybe 4-6 hours, OMG I’m serious, pain in heel is gone. Its crazy to me, that the ONE time for a few hours did that, but it did. I still wear a soft shoe around house, I don’t want the pain to come back. So… it worked wonders for me!!!! so…. grateful!! so… I thought I submitted this, guess not, so…. as I walk around running errands my pain (mild) has come back, used the boot for a couple hours, still have a little pain, now I don’t know what to think. I will continue to use it, maybe more often, can’t hurt to try it, that’s my bottom line. – Eddie T

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How can the DMEforLess Dorsal Hybrid Night Splint help my foot pain?

Anyone who has had plantar fasciitis I am sure would agree, is no fun.  People with this condition often experience heel pain, foot pain, stiffness, and tenderness.  The pain is especially intense first thing in the morning as you take your first steps.   To treat these symptoms, your physical therapist or doctor might recommend that you wear a night splint that stretches your calf and the arch of your foot while you sleep.

What are the benefits of using a Night Splint?

The most significant benefit for most people who use a night splint is dramatically improving morning pain, or the painful stabbing sensation to the heels with the first few steps in the morning. Wearing a night splint to keep the foot and arch stretched keeps the plantar fascia ligament from contracting and becoming less flexible (and more vulnerable to pain) in the morning.

Wearing a plantar fasciitis night splint can also improve your heel pain in the following ways:

  • Improving circulation and blood flow while you sleep, which can help break up adhesions and scar tissue
  • Speed up the healing process by allowing you to treat your heel pain while you sleep

 

How does a night splint work?

Night splints are an extension of stretching and works on the same principal. However, a night splint is worn for longer periods, applying a constant stretch to the plantar fascia.  Several key studies show that wearing a night splint “significantly improves” symptoms of plantar fasciitis.

Night splints are especially effective when used as part of a day/night treatment method, tag-teaming the nighttime stretch with the use of orthotic inserts, stretching, and icing during the day. This approach helps keep the arch supported and cushioned while walking or moving about, reduces inflammation that may prologue healing time, and extends the power of conservative treatment into the nighttime hours.

How often are night splints commonly worn?

Ideally your night splint should be worn all night, but this is often impractical when beginning. Start with wearing your night splint for periods of 15-30 minutes at a time, several times a day, then this should have a similar effect. Night splints can take some getting used to and they do need to be worn consecutively for a week or two before any the pain relief effects are experienced. Night splints can be very helpful with the pain on first weight bearing (e.g. getting out of bed/standing after a long period of sitting) and can help ease this symptom – particularly if worn before first weight bearing – i.e. put it on 10 minutes before you get out of bed.

You should give first lines of treatments such as a night splint, 6 to 12 weeks to have an effect. If you are getting improvement, you should continue these treatments until the symptoms have resolved. If in the future the same symptoms return, then restart the first line treatments. The good new is more than 98% of patient’s symptoms will resolve with this conservative self management. If you do not improve then see your GP. They may refer you to see a physiotherapist or podiatrist

What causes my pain?

The reason for this pain is caused by your plantar fascia, whose job is supporting the arch of your foot and absorbing shock when you walk. If tension and stress on your fascia becomes too great, small tears can occur.  Repeated stretching and tearing can irritate or inflame the fascia, although the cause remains unclear in many cases of plantar fasciitis.

What are other common types of conservatize treatment for plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is treated by measures that decrease inflammation and avoid reinjury.  Such as:

  • Local ice massage applications both reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Physical therapy methods, including stretching exercises and night splints, are used to treat and prevent plantar fasciitis.
  • Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen (Advil) or cortisone injections, are often helpful.
  • Sports running shoes with soft, cushioned soles can be helpful in reducing irritation of inflamed tissues from plantar fasciitis.
  • Custom orthotic shoe inserts are used to reduce the excess motion of the foot and decrease strain to the plantar fascia.

What if conservative treatments are not working?

If more-conservative measures aren’t working after several months, your doctor might recommend:

  • Injecting steroid medication into the tender area can provide temporary pain relief. Multiple shots aren’t recommended because they can weaken your plantar fascia and possibly cause it to rupture. Using ultrasound imaging, platelet-rich plasma obtained from the patient’s own blood can be injected to promote tissue healing.
  • Extracorporeal shock wave therapy. In this procedure, sound waves are directed at the area of heel pain to stimulate healing. It’s usually used for chronic plantar fasciitis that hasn’t responded to more-conservative treatments. Some studies show promising results, but it hasn’t been shown to be consistently effective.
  • Ultrasonic tissue repair. This minimally invasive technology was developed in part by Mayo Clinic doctors. It uses ultrasound imaging to guide a needlelike probe into the damaged plantar fascia tissue. Using ultrasound energy, the probe tip vibrates rapidly to break up the damaged tissue, which is then suctioned out.
  • Few people need surgery to detach the plantar fascia from the heel bone. It is generally an option only when the pain is severe and other treatments have failed. It can be done as an open procedure or through a small incision with local anesthesia.

What is my prognosis?

The prognosis for plantar fasciitis is usually very good. Plantar fasciitis generally resolves with the conservative measures described above. However, in some cases, the condition can evolve into plantar fasciosis, which responds to a different set of treatments than those used for plantar fasciitis.

 

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